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Secure your apache with mod_security

http://www.howtoforge.com/book/print/1375 Secure Your Apache With mod_security
Secure Your Apache With mod_security
Version 1.0 Author: Falko Timme <ft [at] falkotimme [dot] com> Last edited 07/05/2006 This article shows how to install and configure mod_security. mod_security is an Apache module (for Apache 1 and 2) that provides intrusion detection and prevention for web applications. It aims at shielding web applications from known and unknown attacks, such as SQL injection attacks, cross-site scripting, path traversal attacks, etc. In the first chapter I will show how to install mod_security on Debian Sarge, Ubuntu 6.06 LTS (Dapper Drake), and on Fedora Core 5, and in the second chapter I will describe how to configure Apache for independent from the distribution you're using. I want to say first that this is not the only way of setting up such a system. There are many ways of achieving this goal but this is the way I take. I do not issue any guarantee that this will work for you! 1 Installation
1.1 Debian Sarge
mod_security is available as a Debian package in the default Debian repositories, therefore the installation is as simple as this: apt-get install libapache2-mod-securitya2enmod mod-security/etc/init.d/apache2 force-reload 1.2 Ubuntu 6.06 LTS (Dapper Drake)
The installation is exactly the same as on Debian Sarge: apt-get install libapache2-mod-securitya2enmod mod-security/etc/init.d/apache2 force-reload 1.3 Fedora Core 5
On Fedora, you can install and activate mod_security like this: yum install mod_security/etc/init.d/httpd restart You should now find the file /etc/httpd/conf.d/mod_security.conf which already contains a basic mod_security configuration: vi /etc/httpd/conf.d/mod_security.conf # Example configuration file for the mod_security Apache module LoadModule security_module modules/mod_security.so # Turn the filtering engine On or Off SecFilterEngine On # The audit engine works independently and # can be turned On of Off on the per-server or # on the per-directory basis SecAuditEngine RelevantOnly # Make sure that URL encoding is valid SecFilterCheckURLEncoding On # Unicode encoding check SecFilterCheckUnicodeEncoding On # Only allow bytes from this range SecFilterForceByteRange 1 255 # Cookie format checks.
SecFilterCheckCookieFormat On # The name of the audit log file SecAuditLog logs/audit_log # Should mod_security inspect POST payloads SecFilterScanPOST On # Default action set SecFilterDefaultAction "deny,log,status:406" # Prevent path traversal (.) attacks # SecFilter "\.\./" # Weaker XSS protection but allows common HTML tags # SecFilter "<( |\n)*script" # Prevent XSS atacks (HTML/Javascript injection) # SecFilter "<(.|\n)+>" # Very crude filters to prevent SQL injection attacks # SecFilter "delete[[:space:]]+from" # SecFilter "insert[[:space:]]+into" # SecFilter "select.+from" # Require HTTP_USER_AGENT and HTTP_HOST headers http://www.howtoforge.com/book/print/1375 SecFilterSelective "HTTP_USER_AGENT|HTTP_HOST" "^$" # Only accept request encodings we know how to handle # we exclude GET requests from this because some (automated) # clients supply "text/html" as Content-Type SecFilterSelective REQUEST_METHOD "!^GET$" chain SecFilterSelective HTTP_Content-Type "!(^$|^application/x-www-form-urlencoded$|^multipart/form-data)" # Require Content-Length to be provided with # every POST request SecFilterSelective REQUEST_METHOD "^POST$" chain SecFilterSelective HTTP_Content-Length "^$" # Don't accept transfer encodings we know we don't handle # (and you don't need it anyway) SecFilterSelective HTTP_Transfer-Encoding "!^$" # Some common application-related rules from # http://modsecrules.monkeydev.org/rules.php?safety=safe #Nuke Bookmarks XSS SecFilterSelective THE_REQUEST "/modules\.php\?name=Bookmarks\&file=(del_cat\&catname|del_mark\&markname|edit_cat\&catname|edit_cat\&catcomment|marks\&catname|uploadbookmarks\&category)=(<[[:space:]]*script|(http|https|ftp)\:/)" #Nuke Bookmarks Marks.php SQL Injection Vulnerability SecFilterSelective THE_REQUEST "modules\.php\?name=Bookmarks\&file=marks\&catname=.*\&category=.*/\*\*/(union|select|delete|insert)" #PHPNuke general XSS attempt #/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=1&optionbox= SecFilterSelective THE_REQUEST "/modules\.php\?*name=<[[:space:]]*script" # PHPNuke SQL injection attempt SecFilterSelective THE_REQUEST "/modules\.php\?*name=Search*instory=" #phpnuke sql insertion SecFilterSelective THE_REQUEST "/modules\.php*name=Forums.*file=viewtopic*/forum=.*\'/" # WEB-PHP phpbb quick-reply.php arbitrary command attempt SecFilterSelective THE_REQUEST "/quick-reply\.php" chain SecFilter "phpbb_root_path=" #Topic Calendar Mod for phpBB Cross-Site Scripting Attack SecFilterSelective THE_REQUEST "/calendar_scheduler\.php\?start=(<[[:space:]]*script|(http|https|ftp)\:/)" #phpMyAdmin Export.PHP File Disclosure Vulnerability SecFilterSelective SCRIPT_FILENAME "export\.php$" chain SecFilterSelective ARG_what "\.\." #phpMyAdmin path vln SecFilterSelective REQUEST_URI "/css/phpmyadmin\.css\.php\?GLOBALS\[cfg\]\[ThemePath\]=/etc" You can keep this configuration, but to get a better understanding of what mod_security can do, you should comment out the <IfModule mod_security.c>.</IfModule>your own mod_security ruleset, or just switch back to this one.
Copyright 2006 Falko TimmeAll Rights Reserved.
Secure Your Apache With mod_security - Page 2
2 Configuration
Now let's start with a basic mod_security configuration that allows us to insert rules quickly. We put all mod_security rules in the global Apache configuration (it is possible to use most of the directives in a virtual host context, too,
but not all).
On Debian and Ubuntu, we edit /etc/apache2/apache2.conf and put this at the end of it: <IfModule mod_security.c> # Turn the filtering engine On or Off SecFilterEngine On # Make sure that URL encoding is valid SecFilterCheckURLEncoding On # Unicode encoding check SecFilterCheckUnicodeEncoding Off # Only allow bytes from this range SecFilterForceByteRange 0 255 # Only log suspicious requests SecAuditEngine RelevantOnly # The name of the audit log file SecAuditLog /var/log/apache2/audit_log # Debug level set to a minimum SecFilterDebugLog /var/log/apache2/modsec_debug_log SecFilterDebugLevel 0 # Should mod_security inspect POST payloads SecFilterScanPOST On # By default log and deny suspicious requests # with HTTP status 500 SecFilterDefaultAction "deny,log,status:500" On Fedora, we add pretty much the same to /etc/httpd/conf.d/mod_security.conf, but change the paths to the log files as Fedora's Apache uses /var/log/httpd vi /etc/httpd/conf.d/mod_security.conf <IfModule mod_security.c> # Turn the filtering engine On or Off SecFilterEngine On http://www.howtoforge.com/book/print/1375 # Make sure that URL encoding is valid SecFilterCheckURLEncoding On # Unicode encoding check SecFilterCheckUnicodeEncoding Off # Only allow bytes from this range SecFilterForceByteRange 0 255 # Only log suspicious requests SecAuditEngine RelevantOnly # The name of the audit log file SecAuditLog /var/log/httpd/audit_log # Debug level set to a minimum SecFilterDebugLog /var/log/httpd/modsec_debug_log SecFilterDebugLevel 0 # Should mod_security inspect POST payloads SecFilterScanPOST On # By default log and deny suspicious requests # with HTTP status 500 SecFilterDefaultAction "deny,log,status:500" The directives are pretty self-explanatory. SecFilterEngine (On|Off): enables/disables the filtering engine.
SecFilterCheckURLEncoding (On|Off): Special characters need to be encoded before they can be transmitted in the URL. With SecFilterCheckURLEncoding you can check if the necoding is valid. SecFilterCheckUnicodeEncoding (On|Off): enables/disables unicode encoding validation. This should be turned off unless you're sure your web applications and the operating system can handle unicode.
SecFilterForceByteRange: force requests to consist only of bytes from a certain byte range. This can be useful to avoid stack overflow attacks. Default range values are 0 and 255, i.e. all byte values are allowed.
SecAuditEngine (On|Off|RelevantOnly): enables/disables mod_security logging. RelevantOnly means: only log relevant requests. Relevant requests are those requests that caused a filter match.
SecAuditLog: the path to the mod_security log file.
SecFilterDebugLog: path to mod_security's debug log.
SecFilterDebugLevel (0-9): controls how detailed the debug log is. 0: nothing gets logged (for production systems); 1: significant events; 2: info messages; 3: more detailed info messages; .
SecFilterScanPOST (On|Off): with mod_security, you cannot only scan GET variables, you can also scan POST variables (from a form on a web site, etc.). This is disabled by default, but can be enabled with SecFilterScanPOST.
SecFilterDefaultAction: sets the default action for an event that is filtered by our filtering ruleset (which we still have to define). This directive is followed by actions to take, e.g. log it to the audit log, and return a 500 (internal server error) error to the user. I will explain the most important actions next.
These are the most important actions mod_security can apply to an event that is catched by the filtering ruleset: pass: Allow request to continue on filter match. This action is useful when you want to log a match but otherwise do not want to take action.
allow: This is a stronger version of the previous filter. After this action is performed the request will be allowed through and no other filters will be tried.
deny: Interrupt request processing on a filter match. Unless the status action is used too, ModSecurity will immediately return a HTTP 500 error code.
status: Use the supplied HTTP status code when the request is denied.
redirect: On filter match redirect the user to the given URL.
exec: Execute a binary on filter match. Full path to the binary is required.
log: Log filter match to the Apache error log.
nolog: Do not log the filter match. This will also prevent the audit logging from taking place.
chain: Rule chaining allows you to chain several rules into a bigger test.
auditlog: Log the transaction information to the audit log.
noauditlog: Do not log transaction information to the audit log.
Until now not much has happened. I will now present a few filter rules that should give you an idea what you can do with mod_security. Let's assume you have an application that is vulnerable to SQL injection attacks. An attacker could try to delete all records from a MySQL table like this: http://www.example.com/login.php?user=tom';DELETE%20FROM%20users-- SecFilter "delete[[:space:]]+from" Whenever a request is caught by your filter, something like this is logged to your audit_log: ========================================Request: 192.168.0.207 - - [04/Jul/2006:23:43:00 +1200] "GET /login.php?user=tom';DELETE%20FROM%20users-- HTTP/1.1" 500 1215Handler: (null)----------------------------------------GET /login.php?user=tom';DELETE%20FROM%20users-- HTTP/1.1Host: 192.168.0.100User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; en-US; rv:1.8.0.4) Gecko/20060508 Firefox/1.5.0.4Accept: text/xml,application/xml,application/xhtml+xml,text/html;q=0.9,text/plain;q=0.8,image/png,*/*;q=0.5Accept-Language: en-us,en;q=0.5Accept-Encoding: gzip,deflateAccept-Charset: ISO-8859-1,utf-8;q=0.7,*;q=0.7Keep-Alive: 300Connection: keep-alivemod_security-message: Access denied with code 500. Pattern match "delete[[:space:]]+from" at THE_REQUESTmod_security-action: 500 HTTP/1.1 500 Internal Server ErrorLast-Modified: Fri, 21 Oct 2005 14:30:18 GMTETag: "8238-4bf-833a5280"Accept-Ranges: bytesContent-Length: 1215Connection: closeContent-Type: text/html and SecFilterDefaultAction is applied (i.e., the request is denied, logged, and the user gets a 500 error). If you want a different action to take place, you can specify this individually for each filter rule, like this: SecFilter "delete[[:space:]]+from" log,redirect:http://example.com/invalid_request.html http://www.howtoforge.com/book/print/1375 This would redirect the request to a HTML page that could say something about that the request was invalid. To prevent more SQL injection attacks, we can add a few other rules: SecFilter "insert[[:space:]]+into"SecFilter "select.+from"SecFilter "drop[[:space:]]table" The following directives help to prevent cross-site scripting attacks: SecFilter "<script"SecFilter "<.+>" This one is for preventing path traversal attacks: Please note: sometimes you find
As of mod_security 1.8, there is no need to escape dots anymore. This is managed automatically by mod_security which means you it doesn't mastter if you escape dots or not! This one blocks all requests that do not contain the string php in it: This directive blocks requests that try to execute /bin/sh on your server: This one blocks all requests that contain the string viagra: You can also use regular expressions like here: SecFilter "(viagra|mortgage|herbal)" The problem with the SecFilter directive is that it scans the whole request instead of particular fields. If the referrer is ihateviagra.mydomain.com, it would be blocked by the last two directives. But if you want to prevent comment spam, and your form to submit comments uses the POST method, then it would be better to just scan the POST variables for the string viagra. We can do this with the SecFilterSelective "POST_PAYLOAD" "viagra" You can also scan other fields of the request: SecFilterSelective "HTTP_REFERER" "(viagra|mortgage|texasholdem)" would block all requests that contain either viagra, mortgage, or texasholdem in the HTTP_REFERER field.
This rule requires HTTP_USER_AGENT and HTTP_HOST headers in every request: SecFilterSelective "HTTP_USER_AGENT|HTTP_HOST" "^$" SecFilterSelective "REMOTE_ADDR" "^1.2.3.4$" If you have an input field url in your comment form, and you want to scan the value of url for the string viagra, you do it like this: SecFilterSelective "ARG_url" "viagra" The following rule would redirect the Googlebot to the Google start page: SecFilterSelective "HTTP_USER_AGENT" "Google" nolog,redirect:http://www.google.com You can find a list of all fields you can scan in the ModSecurity documentation: http://www.modsecurity.org/documentation/modsecurity-apache/1.9.3/html-multipage/04-rules.html#N103D0 You should also check out these pages: http://www.onlamp.com/pub/a/apache/2003/11/26/mod_security.html and http://atomicplayboy.net/blog/2005/01/30/an-introduction-to-mod-security/and a more detailed explanation about what mod_security can do. mod_security also allows your Apache to pretend it's another web server, e.g. like this: SecServerSignature "Microsoft-IIS/5.0" If Apache shouldn't show a signature at all, use this: mod_security also allows you to filter outgoing content. For example, if you use PHP scripts, and there's a possibility that your PHP scripts result in a fatal error, and you don't want to show the real error message to your users (because it can contain some important details that only you should see), you can do it like this: SecFilterScanOutput OnSecFilterSelective OUTPUT "Fatal error:" deny,status:500ErrorDocument 500 /php-fatal-error.html If a fatal error occurs, the user will be redirected to the file php-fatal-error.html (which you must create before, of course). This should give you a basic idea what you can do with mod_security. For more examples and details, you should definitely visit these URLs: http://www.modsecurity.orghttp://www.modsecurity.org/projects/rules/index.htmlhttp://www.modsecurity.org/documentation/modsecurity-apache/1.9.3/html-multipage/index.htmlhttp://www.onlamp.com/pub/a/apache/2003/11/26/mod_security.htmlhttp://atomicplayboy.net/blog/2005/01/30/an-introduction-to-mod-security There's also an online rule creator for mod_security here: http://leavesrustle.com/tools/modsecurity which helps you to create your own rules.
http://www.howtoforge.com/book/print/1375 You should now be able to add your own rules to the basic configuration from above. If you're unsure, you can start with this configuration: <IfModule mod_security.c> # Turn the filtering engine On or Off SecFilterEngine On # Change Server: string SecServerSignature " " # Make sure that URL encoding is valid SecFilterCheckURLEncoding On # This setting should be set to On only if the Web site is # using the Unicode encoding. Otherwise it may interfere with # the normal Web site operation.
SecFilterCheckUnicodeEncoding Off # Only allow bytes from this range SecFilterForceByteRange 1 255 # The audit engine works independently and # can be turned On of Off on the per-server or # on the per-directory basis. "On" will log everything, # "DynamicOrRelevant" will log dynamic requests or violations, # and "RelevantOnly" will only log policy violations SecAuditEngine RelevantOnly # The name of the audit log file SecAuditLog /var/log/apache2/audit_log # Should mod_security inspect POST payloads SecFilterScanPOST On # Action to take by default SecFilterDefaultAction "deny,log,status:500" # Require HTTP_USER_AGENT and HTTP_HOST in all requests SecFilterSelective "HTTP_USER_AGENT|HTTP_HOST" "^$" # Prevent path traversal (.) attacks SecFilter "./" # Weaker XSS protection but allows common HTML tags SecFilter "<[[:space:]]*script" # Prevent XSS atacks (HTML/Javascript injection) SecFilter "<(.|n)+>" # Very crude filters to prevent SQL injection attacks SecFilter "delete[[:space:]]+from" SecFilter "insert[[:space:]]+into" SecFilter "select.+from" SecFilter "drop[[:space:]]table" # Protecting from XSS attacks through the PHP session cookie SecFilterSelective ARG_PHPSESSID "!^[0-9a-z]*$" SecFilterSelective COOKIE_PHPSESSID "!^[0-9a-z]*$"</IfModule> Another good starting point is the configuration proposed by the mod_security documentation (http://www.modsecurity.org/documentation/modsecurity-apache/1.9.3/html-multipage/aa-recommended_configuration.html <IfModule mod_security.c> # Turn ModSecurity On SecFilterEngine On # Reject requests with status 403 SecFilterDefaultAction "deny,log,status:403" # Some sane defaults SecFilterScanPOST On SecFilterCheckURLEncoding On SecFilterCheckUnicodeEncoding Off # Accept almost all byte values SecFilterForceByteRange 1 255 # Server masking is optional # SecServerSignature "Microsoft-IIS/5.0" SecUploadDir /tmp SecUploadKeepFiles Off # Only record the interesting stuff SecAuditEngine RelevantOnly SecAuditLog /var/log/apache2/audit_log # You normally won't need debug logging SecFilterDebugLevel 0 SecFilterDebugLog /var/log/apache2/modsec_debug_log # Only accept request encodings we know how to handle # we exclude GET requests from this because some (automated) # clients supply "text/html" as Content-Type SecFilterSelective REQUEST_METHOD "!^(GET|HEAD)$" chain SecFilterSelective HTTP_Content-Type \ "!(^application/x-www-form-urlencoded$|^multipart/form-data;)" # Do not accept GET or HEAD requests with bodies SecFilterSelective REQUEST_METHOD "^(GET|HEAD)$" chain SecFilterSelective HTTP_Content-Length "!^$" # Require Content-Length to be provided with # every POST request SecFilterSelective REQUEST_METHOD "^POST$" chain SecFilterSelective HTTP_Content-Length "^$" # Don't accept transfer encodings we know we don't handle SecFilterSelective HTTP_Transfer-Encoding "!^$"</IfModule> Or you take the configuration that comes with Fedora's mod_security package. Always make sure you adjust the paths to the log files! Apache Module mod_security: http://www.modsecurity.orgmod_security Documentation: http://www.modsecurity.org/documentation/modsecurity-apache/1.9.3/html-multipage/index.htmlModSecurity Rules: http://www.modsecurity.org/projects/rules/index.htmlIntroducing mod_security (onlamp.com): http://www.onlamp.com/pub/a/apache/2003/11/26/mod_security.htmlAn introduction to mod_security (atomicplayboy.net): http://atomicplayboy.net/blog/2005/01/30/an-introduction-to-mod-securityOnline Rule Creator For mod_security: http://leavesrustle.com/tools/modsecurity Copyright 2006 Falko TimmeAll Rights Reserved.

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