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GEF MSP Sub-Saharan Africa Project (GF/6010-0016): “Development and Protection of the Coastal andMarine Environment in Sub-Saharan Africa” Partnership Conference of the African Process forthe Development and Protection of the Coastal andMarine Environment in sub-Saharan Africa SUMMARY OF PROJECT PROPOSALS
Disclaimer:
The proposals within this document do not necessarily reflect the views or official policies of countriesand organisations involved.
The budgets corresponding to each project proposal are preliminary and are still undergoing thoroughconsultation processes within the respective countries. Therefore, they do not indicate the actualfinancial commitment that would be provided by participating countries once the project proposal and itscomponents are finalised.
The components of the GEF MSP Sub-Saharan Africa Project (GF/6010-0016) “Development andProtection of the Coastal and Marine Environment in Sub-Saharan Africa” have been supported, in cashand kind, by GEF, UNEP, IOC-UNESCO, the GPA Coordination Office and ACOPS. Support has alsobeen received from the Governments of Canada, The Netherlands, Norway, United Kingdom and theUSA, as well as the Governments of Côte d’Ivoire, the Gambia, Ghana, Kenya, Mauritius, Mozambique,Nigeria, Senegal, Seychelles, South Africa and Tanzania.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Mitigation of Coastal Erosion Control and Restoration of Degraded Areas in sub-Saharan Africa Supporting the Implementation of Integrated Marine and Coastal Area Management (ICAM) in Assessment of the Vulnerability of sub-Saharan Coastal Zones to the Different Impacts of Climate 5Change Conservation of Biodiversity through the Enhancement and/or Establishment of Marine Protected Promoting the Establishment of RAMSAR sites and Developing Participatory and Integrated Approaches for River Effective Integrated River Basin Management in sub-Saharan Africa Improving the Protection and Stability of Coral Reefs and Associated Communities Development of sound land-use practices and Reduction of suspended solids in estuaries and Development of Sustainable Coastal Tourism Development Policies & Strategies Promoting Environmental Sustainability within the Tourism Industry through Implementation of an Eco-certification and Labelling Pilot Programme for Hotels Preparation of National Ecotourism Strategies and Implementation of Pilot Projects Pilot Measures to Demonstrate the Best Practices in Mitigating Environmental Impacts of Assessment and Mitigation of the Ecological and Socio-economic Impacts of Destructive Fishing Mariculture Development in sub-Saharan Africa Impact of Global Climate Change on Key Marine and Costal Ecosystems in sub-Saharan Africa Strengthening Management, Monitoring, Control and Surveillance (MCS) Capacity in Fisheries Management Organisations in sub-Saharan Africa Solid Waste Management and Pollution control Development and Application of Technologies for Sewage Treatment in Cities and Towns Strengthening of Oil Spill Management and Contingency Capabilities in sub-Saharan Africa Mitigation of Coastal Erosion and Restoration of Degraded Areas in sub-Saharan REQUESTING COUNTRIES
REQUESTING NATIONAL/REGIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
Côte d’Ivoire: Ministère de l’Equipement
The Gambia: National Environmental Agency (NEA)
Ghana: Ministry of Environment & Science, Ministry of Works
and Housing
Kenya: Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute (KMFRI)
Mauritius: Ministry of Environment
Mozambique: Ministry of Coordination and Environmental Affairs
(MICOA)
Nigeria: Federal Ministry of Environment
Senegal: Ministère de la Jeunesse, de l’Environnement et de
l’Hygiène Publique
Seychelles: Ministry of Environment
South Africa: Ministry of Environmental Affairs and Tourism
Tanzania: National Environment Management Council (NEMC)
ENDORSEMENT:
Côte d’Ivoire:
Ministère de l'Equipement, Ministère de
l'Enseignement Supérieur et de la Recherché Scientifique
The Gambia: National Environment Agency (NEA)
Ghana: Ministry of Environment and Science, Ministry of Works
and Housing
Kenya: Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute (KMFRI),
(Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development), Ministry of
Environment and Natural Resources.
Mauritius: Ministry of Environment
Mozambique: MICOA
Nigeria: Federal Ministry of Environment
Senegal:
Establishments, Ministry of Youth, the Environment and Public
Hygiene
Seychelles: Principal Secretary, Ministry of Environment
South Africa: Deputy Minister, Ministry of Environmental Affairs
and Tourism
Tanzania: Ministry of Environment
PROJECT LOCATIONS
EXECUTING AGENCIES
Côte d’Ivoire: Grand-Lahou area
Côte d’Ivoire: Port Autonome d'Abidjan (PAA), Centre de
The Gambia: All coastline
Ghana: Ada-Volta Delta Anyanui
The Gambia: Department of State for Tourism and Culture
Ghana: Ministry of Works and Housing - Hydrological Services
Kenya: Malindi Bay
Mauritius: Flic and Flac, Riambel and Kenya: Coast Development Authority
Grand Bay
Mauritius: Ministry of Environment
Mozambique: Maputo Bay, Beira
Mozambique: MICOA
Nigeria: All coastline
Nigeria: Federal Ministry of Environment
Senegal: Cap-Vert Peninsula – Little
Senegal: Office of Environment and the Classified Establishments
in collaboration with the University of Dakar and Office of Civil Seychelles: East Coast of Mahé, Anse
Seychelles: Ministry of Environment
South Africa: Langebaan
South Africa: Saldanha Bay Municipality, Common Ground
Tanzania: Dar es Salaam, Jambiani in
Consulting, Prestedge Retief Dresner Wijnberg, local contractors Tanzania: National Environment Management Council (NEMC)
BACKGROUND AND OVERALL GOAL OR OBJECTIVE
Widespread erosion of sub-Saharan coasts, as a consequence of anthropogenic or natural causes, has been
pointed out as one of the most devastating environmental problems faced by African countries, and given its
consequences upon ecological and socioeconomic systems, it was included in the National Reports of the
participating countries as one of the most pressing priorities for intervention. The threat of sea-level rise due
to global warming will contribute to further degrade coastal zones. This project aims to restore degraded
hotspots and sensitive areas through the design and testing of protective measures, while enhancing national
capacity for coastal zone protection and management.
IMMEDIATE OBJECTIVES & EXPECTED RESULTS
The main objectives of this project are: (1) to assess and map affected or vulnerable areas, populations and
resources, (2) to design and test restoration and protection measures in degraded (eroded or accreted) hotspots
and sensitive areas, and (3) to enhance sub-Saharan capacity for sustainable coastal protection methods and
management.
The pursuit of these objectives shall deliver the following results: (a) an assessment of hotspots and degraded
areas, (b) mitigation measures to restore degraded areas, (c) increased national capacity through local
professional training, technology transfer and international co-operation, and (d) increased awareness among
relevant stakeholders.
MAIN COMPONENTS & ACTIVITIES
National participation in each one of the project components shall be determined by the priorities identified in
the national reports and by relevant ongoing programmes or projects; thus, some countries like Gambia shall
only participate in this project by sharing their information and experience.
Component 1: Identification of hotspots and sensitive areas through collation of relevant geographical
information and assessment of present levels of shoreline change.
Component 2: Research on the factors affecting shoreline change and possible mitigation options, followed by
an assessment of the causes of erosion in selected sites. Strategies for mitigation shall be planned, designed
and implemented in the chosen locations.
Component 3: Capacity building and awareness raising, through activities such as staff training, information
technologies sharing, development of regional workshops, establishment of information networks and
conduction of public awareness campaigns.
TIME FRAME
3-5 years, depending on component duration COST & FINANCING
POTENTIAL INTERNATIONAL,
MULTILATERAL & BILATERAL
SOURCES
CO-FINANCING

LINKAGES TO RELEVANT ONGOING PROJECTS, PROGRAMMES & ACTIVITIES
This project is linked to regional and sub-regional programmes such as the Nairobi and Abidjan Conventions,
the UNEP Regional Seas Programme, the Gulf of Guinea Large Marine Ecosystem project and the SIDA-
funded Marine Science for Management (MASMA). Links to existing national projects and programmes
include the ADB-funded “Coastal Protection” project in The Gambia, the “Keta Sea Defence Project” in
Ghana, and the Seychelles beach erosion strategy, funded by the Regional Environmental Programme of the
Indian Ocean Commission (COI).
SUSTAINABILITY FACTORS:
By designing and implementing strategies to deal with coastal erosion on the basis of a thorough assessment
of current national and regional needs, the project will contribute to environmental preservation and
remediation, and to the implementation of solid policy and institutional frameworks. With its strong
emphasis on awareness-raising and evaluation schemes, this project can assist in strengthening local
stakeholder participation in the implementation of adaptive strategies while providing solid databases and
expertise that will be crucial for the implementation of future programmes.
Supporting the Development and Implementation of Integrated Coastal
Area Management (ICAM) in sub-Saharan Africa
REQUESTING COUNTRIES
Côte d’Ivoire, The Gambia
REQUESTING NATIONAL/REGIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
Côte d'Ivoire - Ministère de l'Enseignement Supérieur et de la Recherche
Ghana - Ministry of the Environment
Kenya - Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources
Mauritius - Ministry Environment
Nigeria - Federal Ministry of Environment
Senegal - Ministère de la Jeunesse, de l’Environnement et de l’Hygiène
Seychelles - Ministry of Environment
ENDORSEMENT:
Côte d’Ivoire:
Ministère de l'Environnement et du Cadre de Vie
Ghana: Ministry of Environment and Science
Kenya: Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute (KMFRI) (Ministry
of Agriculture and Rural Development), Ministry of Environment and
Natural Resources.
Mauritius: Ministry of Environment
Nigeria: Federal Ministry of Environment
Senegal: Ministère de la Jeunesse, de l’Environnement et de l’Hygiène
publique
Seychelles: Principal Secretary, Ministry of Environment
PROJECT LOCATIONS
EXECUTING AGENCY(IES)
Côte d’Ivoire: Grand Bassam
Côte d'Ivoire - Centre de Recherche Oceanologiques (CRO)
Ghana: Ada/Anyanui Volta
Ghana - Committee including Environmental Protection Agency, Ghana
Ports and Harbours Authority, Hydrological Services Department, Ghana Tourist Development Company, Fisheries Department, Town and Country Kenya: Ngomeni
Mauritius: All coastline
Kenya - Kenya Marine Fisheries Research Institute (KMFRI), Ministry of
Nigeria: Lagos islands
Agricultural and Rural Development, Ministry of Environment and Natural Senegal: Djiffere
Seychelles: Anse Volbert
Mauritius - Ministry of Environment - ICZM Unit
Nigeria - Nigerian Institute of Oceanography, Federal Ministry of
Environment, Niger Delta Development Corporation (NDDC)
Senegal - Direction de l’Environnement et des Etablissements Classés
Seychelles - Ministry of Environment - ICZM Unit
BACKGROUND AND OVERALL GOAL OR OBJECTIVE
Several key issues such as overexploitation, loss of key habitats, pollution and coastal erosion, have been
identified as priority intervention areas for coastal and marine area management, and demand a more holistic
approach; this is especially true in regards to coastal erosion, one of the most critical problems currently faced
by Western Africa. Most countries in the region are developing, or have developed, framework ICAM plans,
but few have managed to further implement them. The aim of this project is to support and facilitate the
development and/or implementation of Integrated Coastal Area Management (ICAM) in sub-Saharan Africa, at
the national level and in selected demonstration sites where erosion has been identified as a main issue, so as
to improve coastal protection and management in the long term.
IMMEDIATE OBJECTIVES & EXPECTED RESULTS
The immediate objectives of this project are: (1) to assess the level of ICAM implementation and experiences
in participating countries, (2) to assess existing constraints to the development of ICAM strategies, (3) to
reduce the specific identified constraints, (4) to enhance coastal protection management in selected sites
through ICAM programmes, and (5) to increase the rates of information and expertise dissemination in the
region, so as to build capacity for ICAM and coastal erosion management. The achievement of these
objectives will produce (i) improved and coordinated resource use strategies in the long term, (ii) improved
and coordinated coastal erosion protection, and (iii) contributions to poverty alleviation in the region.
MAIN COMPONENTS & ACTIVITIES
Component 1: Assessment of existing constraints to ICAM implementation, and review of lessons learned.
Component 2: Reduction of identified constraints through the design of a strategy to complement or
implement, where needed, appropriate ICAM plans.
Component 3: Implementation of the selected constraint reduction strategy and development of the policy,
institutional and regulatory coordination to that end, so as to promote effective stakeholder involvement,
capacity building, public awareness, monitoring and financing mechanisms.
Component 4: Establishment and implementation of ICAM plans at the local level, in selected pilot sites
with erosion problems.
Component 5: Dissemination of information and exchange of expertise and lessons learned.
Component 6: Project management activities, with a focus on project monitoring and evaluation.
TIME FRAME
COST & FINANCING
POTENTIAL INTERNATIONAL,
MULTILATERAL & BILATERAL
SOURCES
CO-FINANCING

LINKAGES TO RELEVANT ONGOING PROJECTS, PROGRAMMES & ACTIVITIES
This project has links to several regional and sub-regional programmes and projects. Firstly, its main
objective is directly in line with the Nairobi and Abidjan Conventions; with its focus on implementation
activities, it will strengthen and complement the Gulf of Guinea Large Marine Ecosystem (GOG-LME)
Programme. Other ongoing associated initiatives include (i) the IOC, COI-PRE and IUCN/NORAD initiative
supporting the implementation of the Jakarta Mandate in the East African Region, (ii) the ICRAN/UNEP
Ecosystem Management Approach programme in Eaast Africa, (iii) the USAID/University of Rhode Island
programme that supports ICAM Plans in Tanzania and Kenya, such as the Kenyan Coastal Management
Initiative and the Tanzania Coastal Management Partnership, (iv) the MICOA/DANIDA ICAM development
support project in Mozambique, (v) the Coastal Zone Management Centre set up with Netherlands support in
Kenya, (vi) SIOCAM’s projected Integrated Management of the Lake Chad Basin and integrated Management
of the Benguela Current Large Marine Ecosystem programmes, (vii) the FFEM-supported project for the
management of the Senegal River, (viii) World Bank programmes such as Integrated Marine and Coastal
Biodiversity in Gambia, Coastal Wetlands Management in Mozambique, Marine & Coastal Biodiversity
Conservation in Senegal, Biodiversity Conservation and Marine Pollution Abatement in Seychelles, and the
Cape Action Plan for the Environment Programme in South Africa, (ix) IUCN programmes in Tanzania
supporting the development of community-based coastal management plans, and (x) the IUCN-USAID
Tanzania Coastal Management Partnership, (xi) the WWF project in mafia Island in Tanzania, among others.
SUSTAINABILITY FACTORS:
The implementation of ICAM, which is one of the areas that the Jakarta Mandate of the Convention on
Biodiversity emphasises, will strengthen efforts to protect and manage endangered marine and coastal
ecosystems, and will incorporate socio-economic and transboundary considerations into sound national
environmental policy-making. By interconnecting and harmonizing isolated initiatives and interventions in
the marine and coastal areas, ICAM policies will contribute to consolidating a more comprehensive approach
towards the protection of crucial natural resources and habitats.
Assessment of the Vulnerability of sub-Saharan Coastal Zones to the
Different Impacts of Climate Change (included sea level rise)
REQUESTING COUNTRIES
REQUESTING NATIONAL/REGIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
Côte d’Ivoire: Ministère de l’Enseignement Supérieur et de la
The Gambia: National Environmental Agency (NEA)
Ghana: Ministry of Environment & Science
Kenya: Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute (KMFRI)
Mauritius: Ministry of Environment
Mozambique: Ministry of Coordination and Environmental Affairs
Nigeria: Federal Ministry of Environment
Senegal: Ministère de la Jeunesse, de l’Environnement et de
l’Hygiène Publique
Seychelles: Ministry of Environment
Tanzania: Vice President’s Office, Department of Environment
ENDORSEMENT:
Côte d’Ivoire :
Ministère de l’Environnement et du Cadre de Vie
The Gambia:
Ghana:
Ministry of Environment & Science
Kenya: Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute (KMFRI)
(Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development), Ministry of
Environment and Natural Resources.
Mauritius:
Mozambique:
Ministry of Coordination and Environmental Affairs
Nigeria: Federal Ministry of Environment
Sénégal: Ministère de la Jeunesse, de l’Environnement et de
l’Hygiène Publique
Seychelles: Principal Secretary, Ministry of Environment
Tanzania: Minister of State in Vice President’s Office, Department
of Environment
PROJECT LOCATIONS
EXECUTING AGENCIES
Côte d’Ivoire: All the coastline
Côte d’Ivoire: Centre de Recherches Océanographiques
The Gambia: Allahein River to Cape
The Gambia: National Environmental Agency (NEA), Coastal and
Ghana: All the coastline
Ghana: Ghana Surveys Department, Hydrological Services
Kenya: Ghazi village
Department, Environmental Protection Agency Mauritius: All the coastline
Kenya: Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute (KMFRI)
Mozambique: Limpopo, Incomati,
Mauritius: Ministry of Environment, Meteorological Services and
Nigeria: All the coastline
Mozambique: Ministry of Coordination and Environmental Affairs
Senegal: All the coastline
Nigeria: Federal Ministry of Environment, Ministry of
Seychelles: All the coastline
Agriculture, Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Tanzania: Dar es Salaam and Zanzibar Research (NIOMR)
Senegal: Direction de l’Environnement et des Etablissements
Classés
Seychelles: Climate Centre
Tanzania: National Environment Management Council
BACKGROUND AND OVERALL GOAL OR OBJECTIVE
Climate change and in particular sea level rise will add pressures on the African coastal zones, leading to
deterioration of physical space, ecosystems, infrastructures and economic activities, and it may also exacerbate
the scale of current threats to critical habitats and species. This would seriously hamper the livelihood and
development options of sub-Saharan coastal areas. The main objective of this project is to carry out a more in-
depth assessment of the vulnerability of participating countries’ coastal zones to the different impacts of
climate change, implementing an integrated approach so as to define threatened coastal zones and national
adaptation strategies. The project will address the impacts of sea-level rise through the determination of
historical trends, map vulnerable areas, develop vulnerability analyses including the impacts of other climate
change parameters, and identify and evaluate adaptation options.
IMMEDIATE OBJECTIVES & EXPECTED RESULTS
The specific objectives of this project will be (i) to measure historical sequences in sea-level rise, (ii) to
identify coastal zone areas and/or sectors which are vulnerable to climate change, (iii) to characterize the
selected areas’ vulnerability, and (iv) to select adaptation options with a regional and integrated approach.
Expected results include (a) a set of data on historical sea level rise, (b) maps of vulnerable coastal zones, (c)
documentation on possible impacts and potential adaptation options, and (d) national adaptation strategies.
MAIN COMPONENTS & ACTIVITIES
Component 1: Determination of historical sea-level rise, through information gathering, determination of sea
level trends for specific periods and data analysis.
Component 2: Delimitation of coastal zones vulnerable to climate change, and analysis of potential impacts.
Component 3: Analysis of the vulnerable coastal areas to determine possible environmental and socio-
economic consequences of climate change.
Component 4: Identification and evaluation of adaptation measures that could help minimize the negative
impacts of climate change at the national and regional levels.
TIME FRAME
COST & FINANCING
POTENTIAL INTERNATIONAL,
MULTILATERAL & BILATERAL
SOURCES
CO-FINANCING

LINKAGES TO RELEVANT ONGOING PROJECTS, PROGRAMMES & ACTIVITIES
This project is closely linked to (i) the revitalization of the Abidjan and Nairobi Conventions, (ii) the Gulf of
Guinea Large Marine Ecosystem Project, (iii) efforts to monitor sea levels through the Global Sea Level
Observing Systems (GLOSS) and the Global Ocean Observing System in Africa (GOOS-Africa), (iv) IOC’s
ODINAFRICA (Ocean Data and Information Network for Africa), (v) the efforts of the Intergovernmental
Panel on Climate Change to assess coastal vulnerability, (vi) the GEF-funded project on Assessment of
Impacts of and Adaptation to Climate Change in Multiple Regions or Sectors, which has been implemented
through 11 African projects, one of which relates to the impacts of climate change on tourism in Seychelles.
SUSTAINABILITY FACTORS:
With its strong emphasis on determining the trends, consequences and impacts of sea-level rise, this project
will pose a fundamental contribution to the design and implementation of possible adaptation strategies in
sub-Saharan Africa, insofar as it will provide essential data and analysis that can support the formulation of
future policy, regulatory and technical strategies in participating countries, at the national and regional level.
Furthermore, project results will constitute databases at the national and sub-regional levels that may be used
by sub-Saharan countries to prepare their national communications to the UNFCCC, and to strengthen their
national development plans.
Conservation of Biodiversity through the Enhancement and/or
Establishment of Marine Protected Areas in sub-Saharan Africa
REQUESTING
REQUESTING NATIONAL/REGIONAL ORGANIZATIONS:
COUNTRIES:
Côte d’Ivoire: Ministry of Environment
Ghana: Ministry of Environment and Science
Mozambique: Ministry of Environmental Affairs Nigeria: Ministry of Natural
Nigeria: Ministry of Environment
Seychelles: Ministry of Environment
South Africa: Department of Environmental Affairs & Tourism
ENDORSEMENT:
Cote d’Ivoire:
Hon. Minister of Environment
Ghana: Hon. Minister of Environment and Science
Mozambique Hon. John Kachamila, Minister of Environmental Affairs
Nigeria: The Honorable Minister, Federal Ministry of Environment, Abuja
Seychelles: Mr. Maurice Lousteau-Lalane, Principal Secretary, Ministry of
Environment
South Africa: Hon. Minister of Environment Affairs and Tourism
PROJECT LOCATIONS
EXECUTING AGENCY(IES)
Côte d’Ivoire:
Ghana: Ada/Anganui Mangrove Complex, Elmina- Mozambique: Ministry of Environmental Affairs,
Eture Lagoon, Princess Town, Cape Three Points, Department of Conservation Areas, Ministry of
Eastern Sandy Shore (Marine Turtle Nesting Site);
Mozambique: Mozambique Island and surroundings, Mozambique NGO), FNP (Forum Natureza em
Primeiras and Segundas, Inhaca Island , Ponta do Perigo).
Ouro
Nigeria: Ministry of environment, NIOMR, Nigerian
Nigeria: Lagos, Eket, Ogoni/Bonny, Dodo/Nun;
Seychelles: Cosmoledo, Mahe, Praslin, La Digue & Seychelles: Conservation Section, Ministry of
Other Inner Islands
South Africa: Groen-Spoeg River, Pondoland, St. South Africa: Department of Environmental Affairs
Lucia and Kosi Bay, Kunene River (initiative to & Tourism (DEAT), KwaZulu-Natal Wildlife, South
include Namibia and Angola)
African National Parks, Eastern Cape NatureConservation, Western Cape Nature Conservation,Northern Cape Nature Conservation, Academic andResearch Institutions BACKGROUND AND OVERALL GOAL OR OBJECTIVE
East and West African coastal habitats differ in terms of impacts and degree of degradation. In the Eastern
African coast, for example, processes carried out by SEACAM, WIOMSA, WWF, IUCN, UNEP, GEMPA,
Nairobi Convention, Jakarta Mandate, etc, identified already a few areas where biodiversity is high and the
potential for conservation is at his best. It is however, recognised that there is a lack of a representative
managed system of protected areas. The general objective of this project is to promote the protection of key
habitats with high ecological value and biological diversity for the benefit of present and future generations of
local communities, and the economy of countries in general.
IMMEDIATE OBJECTIVES & EXPECTED RESULTS
Specific objectives and activities would include: (1) establishing four new MPA’s to better protect and
manage key habitats where there is a need; (2) improving the management of the four existing MPA’s, with
active involvement of local communities; (3) establishment of a regional and national representative network
of MPA’s, (4) assessment of the ecological, socio-economy and cultural value of MPA’s at all levels of
society. Each one of these objectives will give rise to an output in that same sense – thus Objective 1 will
give rise to the creation of new MPAs, Objective 2 will improve the managing of existing protected areas,
Objective 3 will establish a representative MPA network and Objective 4 will provide sound assessment of
MPA’s social, economical and environmental value.
MAIN COMPONENTS & ACTIVITIES
Component 1: establishment of the project management structures,
Component 2: selection of the implementation sites,
Component 3: conduction of studies,
Component 4: establishment of new MPAs,
Component 5: improvement of the existing MPA’s management,
Component 6: establishment of a representative MPA network,
Component 7: formulation and implementation of community-based management structures,
Component 8: evaluation and monitoring, and
Component 9: conduction of seminars and meetings.
TIME FRAME:
COST & FINANCING
TOTAL COST: US$5.5million
POTENTIAL INTERNATIONAL,
MULTILATERAL & BILATERAL
SOURCES
CO-FINANCING

LINKAGES TO RELEVANT ONGOING PROJECTS, PROGRAMMES & ACTIVITIES
Related initiatives include the following: (i) the WWF-EAME financed “Eastern African Marine Eco-regions”
programme, aimed at reversing the degradation of biodiversity in Eastern Africa, (ii) the LME – Gulf of
Guinea project, (iii) several GEF Projects that support the establishment of Protected Areas, such as the
Seychelles Environment Programme, Agulhas Current Initiative. WB linked includes the Coastal and Marine
Biodiversity Project in Mozambique.
SUSTAINABILITY FACTORS
Worldwide experiences have proven that the implementation and effective enforcement of specially protected
areas is a pre-requisite for addressing priority issues such as pollution and destructive fishing practices, which
threaten the successful preservation of endangered ecosystems. By addressing this issue from a regional and
integrated perspective, which takes into account local communities’ needs and seeks to harmonize and link
different MPAs throughout Africa, this project will provide a crucial platform upon which future projects can
be launched, will expand the current coverage of protected areas in sub-Saharan Africa, will contribute to
poverty alleviation, and will also strengthen MPAs that have not been adequately established and/or managed.
Promoting the Establishment of RAMSAR Sites and Developing
Participatory and Integrated Approaches for River Basin Management in
sub-Saharan Africa

REQUESTING COUNTRIES
The Gambia, Ghana, Kenya,
REQUESTING NATIONAL/REGIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
The Gambia: Ministry of Environment
Ghana: Ministry of Environment and Sciences and Ministry of
Waters and Housing
Kenya: Ministry of environment and natural resources
Mozambique: Ministry of Coordination of Environmental Affairs;
Nigeria: Federal Ministry of Environment;
Senegal: Ministry of Environment
South Africa: Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism
(DEAT)
Tanzania: Ministry of Natural Resources and Tourism
ENDORSEMENT:
The Gambia:
Ghana:
Ministry of Environment and Sciences and Ministry of
Waters and Housing
Kenya: Ministry of Environment and natural Resources
Mozambique: Minister of Environment
Nigeria: Federal Ministry of Environment
Senegal: Director of the Environment and Classified
Establishments
South Africa: Minister of Environmental Affairs and Tourism
(DEAT)
Tanzania: Minister for Natural Resources and Tourism
PROJECT LOCATIONS
EXECUTING AGENCIES
The Gambia: Western Gambia
The Gambia: Department of Parks and Wildlife Management
(Baobolong Wetland Reserve), Delta du Ghana: Water Resources Commission, Volta River Authority
Saloum in Senegal
Kenya: Tana & Athi River Development agency (TARDA)
Ghana: Volta, Densus Basin
Mozambique: UEM (Eduardo Mondlane University – UNESCO
Kenya: Tana Delta
Chair of Marine Sciences and Oceanography).
Mozambique: Incomati, Zambezi
Nigeria: Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research
(NIOMR), Nigerian Conservation Fund, NEST.
Nigeria: Niger Delta, Lagos, Elcet,
Senegal: Office of the National Parks of Senegal
South Africa: Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism
Senegal: Delta of the Senegal River.
(DEAT), KwaZulu-Natal Wildlfie, Western Cape nature South Africa: St. Lucia, Orange river
Conservation, Northern Cape Nature Conservation, South African Tanzania: Rufiji River Basin
Tanzania: Department of Forestry and Beekeeping
BACKGROUND AND OVERALL GOAL OR OBJECTIVE
The protection of rivers wetlands is of crucial importance, since they sustain ecologically and socio-
economically critical ecosystems, and are resources in themselves, especially river water. Their frequent trans-
national scope has given rise to several international agreements governing the use of shared river basins;
however, due to different causes –limited knowledge, capacity and political will- these instruments have not
been enforced. They also have critical gaps – in particular, the absence of consideration of river runoff
requirements for the health of the downstream ecosystems. The overall objective of this project is to enhance
integrated river basin and wetland management in participating countries by promoting dialogue between
stakeholders, establishing a network of river basin-related persons and organisations, as well as linkages
between the existing networks, implementing pilot demonstrative projects and conducting multidisciplinary
research in selected sites.
IMMEDIATE OBJECTIVES & EXPECTED RESULTS
Immediate objectives include (i) establishing a network of stakeholders for promoting and sharing best
practices of integrated and participatory river basin management, (ii) promoting the establishment of
RAMSAR sites to protect key wetland sites, and (iii) reducing pressure on the natural resources in the wetland
ecosystems in pilot sites. Expected results include the following: (a) establishment of a network of
stakeholders
active in river basin management, (b) implementation of pilot demonstration projects, (c) production of manuals and review documents for governments and practitioners, (d) establishment of joint
river basin committees, and (e) establishment of new RAMSAR sites and support for existing ones.
MAIN COMPONENTS & ACTIVITIES
Component 1 . Establishment of a knowledge- and experience-sharing network of stakeholders in selected river
basins for developing a common vision on integrated river basin and wetlands management, including
dissemination of information for integrated management and public awareness raising, formulation of
management plans on the grounds of solid research in selected areas, with local community participation.
Component
2. Implementation of a pilot demonstrative project for the sustainable development and conservation of wetlands with involvement of local communities, including the determination of alternative
livelihood initiatives.
TIME FRAME
COST & FINANCING
POTENTIAL INTERNATIONAL,
MULTILATERAL & BILATERAL
SOURCES
CO-FINANCING

LINKAGES TO RELEVANT ONGOING PROJECTS, PROGRAMMES & ACTIVITIES
The present proposal is closely related to (i) international instruments and agreements such as the Nairobi and
Abidjan Conventions, the Biodiversity Convention, UNCLOS and Agenda 21, (ii) the LOICZ (Land-Ocean
Interactions in the Coastal Zone) initiative, (iii) the IUCN wetlands conservation campaign, (iv) the
GPA/LBA Integrated Coastal and River Basin Management initiative, (v) the National Plan of Action
currently being implemented by the Gambian Department of Parks and Wildlife Management within the
context of the RAMSAR Convention, and (vi) the joint Senegal-Gambia initiative for the management of the
Saloum Delta.
SUSTAINABILITY FACTORS:
The preservation of healthy linkages between marine and freshwater ecosystems, on which their mutual
sustainability depends, constitutes a pivotal area of intervention for any serious attempt at marine and coastal
conservation and development. This project, when implemented, will facilitate not only the sustainable
management f related water systems, but also the successful implementation of all the other African Process
projects, which directly or indirectly address the interdependent marine and coastal environments; associated
problems faced by African countries, such as deterioration of public health due to bad water quality, scarce
availability of sustainable livelihood options and high conflict rates associated with access to freshwater and
associated resources, will also be addressed effectively.
Mangrove Management in Sub-Saharan Africa
REQUESTING
REQUESTING NATIONAL/REGIONAL ORGANIZATIONS:
COUNTRIES
Regional: ECOWAS, SADC
Côte d’Ivoire: Ministry of Environment
Gambia, Ghana, Nigeria, The Gambia: National Environment Agency (NEA)
Kenya, Mozambique,
Ghana: Ministry of Environment & Science
Kenya: Coast Development Authority, Forestry Department
Mozambique: Ministry for Coordination of Environmental Affairs
Nigeria: Federal Ministry of Environment, Federal Department of Forestry
Senegal: Office of Environment and the Classified Establishment
Tanzania: Vice-President’s Office (Division of Environment)
ENDORSEMENT: Ministers of Environment / Forestry/ appropriate sector of
participating countries
PROJECT LOCATION S
EXECUTING AGENCIES
Côte d’Ivoire: Ebrie lagoon.
Côte d’Ivoire: Centre de Recherches
The Gambia: Bintang Bolong, Western Gambia.
Ghana: Ada-Volta Estuary-Anyanui Complex;
The Gambia: National Environmental Agency
(NEA), Coastal and Marine Environment Working Kenya: Ngomeni Mangrove Swamps; Mida creek;
Ghana: Ghana Surveys Department, Hydrological
Mozambique: Quirimbas Archipelago; Mozambique
Services Department, Environmental Protection Island; Beira City; Sofala Bay; Inhaca Island; Maputo AgencyBay.
Kenya: Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research
Nigeria: Niger Delta and other areas invaded by exotic Institute (KMFRI)
Nypa Palm
Mozambique: Ministry of Coordination and
Senegal: Saloum estuary; Casamance estuary.
Tanzania: Chakomble; Fumbwini; Matumbini;
Nigeria: Federal Ministry of Environment, Ministry
of Agriculture, Nigerian Institute for Oceanographyand Marine Research (NIOMR) Senegal : Direction de l’Environnement et des
Seychelles : Climate Centre
Tanzania : National Environment Management
BACKGROUND AND OVERALL GOAL OR OBJECTIVE
Mangroves constitute a critical natural resource for the livelihoods of several coastal communities and for the
environment at large. With increases in population, threats to mangrove forests have increased. The variety of
uses of mangroves by local communities are quite broad, and in contrast to the situation of several lowland
forest reserves, few if any mangrove reserves exist in Africa. This proposal seeks to address two major
categories of threats posed upon the mangrove ecosystems in the region, namely overexploitation and
destruction of mangrove habitats, through appropriate and targeted interventions.
IMMEDIATE OBJECTIVES & EXPECTED RESULTS
Immediate objectives are: (i) to carry out socio-economic studies and training on mangrove related issues, (ii)
to generate/increase awareness on the importance of mangroves among the communities and general public,
(iii) to provide demonstration projects on mangrove rehabilitation and alternative sources of energy and
building materials, (iv) to establish mangrove forest reserves, and (v) to develop sustainable livelihoods
options.
Expected results include (1) the gathering of information on the current rates and extent of mangrove
ecosystem deforestation, (2) an assessment of traditional cultural patterns related to mangrove conservation,
which will include the creation of a database on mangrove location and related belief systems, (3) the
provision of training and awareness-raising for mangrove conservation, (4) the implementation of pilot
community plantations of species that can serve as substitutes to mangroves for fuelwood and building
material, (5) pilot mangrove reafforestation projects and alternative livelihood projects, and (6) the
establishment of mangrove reserves.
MAIN COMPONENTS & ACTIVITIES
Component 1 : Socioeconomic studies and training on mangrove related issues, including the creation and
updating of national and regional databases, the assessment of past and current degradation trends, and the
conduction of regional workshops and training sessions for management personnel.
Component 2: Generation and increase of awareness on the importance of mangroves among the communities
and general public, by means of educational programmes through workshops, public fora, film shows, signs
and other communication channels.
Component 3: Implementation of pilot projects on mangrove rehabilitation, and the creation of alternative
sources of energy and building materials, with an emphasis on community mobilisation, education,
motivation and involvement in reforestation exercises, acquisition and preparation of land for pilot projects
and planting of propagules, development of alternative plant materials and encouragement of alternative energy
sources.
Component
4: Establishment of mangrove forest reserves in sensitive or pristine forests, together with the enactment of adequate protective legislation.
Component 5: Sustainable Livelihoods Development, through the organisation of regional training programmes, the determination of optimal management strategies through ecological-economic modelling of
mangrove resources, and the establishment of appropriate income-enhancing alternative livelihoods, such as
pilot fish farms, honey harvesting, vegetable farms, etc.
TIME FRAME:
5 years
TOTAL COST: US$12 million
COST & FINANCING
POTENTIAL INTERNATIONAL,
US$10.8 million (US$ 1.35 million per country) MULTILATERAL & BILATERAL
SOURCES

US$1.2 million (US$0.15 million per country) CO-FINANCING
LINKAGES TO RELEVANT ONGOING PROJECTS, PROGRAMMES & ACTIVITIES
Related ongoing initiatives and programmes include the following: (i) the Abidjan and Nairobi Conventions,
which seek to promote conservation of biodiversity and sustainable use of ecosystems, (ii) certain components
of programmes implemented by UNEP, UNIDO, GEF, SEACAM, WIOMSA, WWF and IUCN in the
region, which focus on reducing –directly or indirectly- mangrove degradation; these include poverty reduction
programs, flood control measures, use of biogas for energy, and protection of coastal areas; (iii) DFID, SIDA,
GEF, UNDP and UNIDO have either supported similar projects or are currently supporting mangrove
regeneration projects within the region; (iv) the GEF-funded Gulf of Guinea Large Marine Ecosystem Project,
together with the World Bank and CIDA projects in Tanzania, included components on mangrove
management; (v) DFID also supported mangrove management studies at the Lower Volta area in Ghana; (vi)
the Nigerian Federal Government has initiated a pilot community-based project for the restoration of
mangroves in some areas invaded by the Nypa palm; (vii) the GEF-financed Coastal and Marine Biodiversity
Management Project in Mozambique, which includes elements on the establishment of marine conservation
areas, which will benefit mangrove conservation.
SUSTAINABILITY FACTORS:
The preservation and development of threatened mangrove forests has been proven to generate significant
benefits, such as erosion control (mangroves provide vegetation cover that protect shorelines from storms),
nurseries, provision of nutrients and sustainable generation of raw materials. The participation of local
stakeholders through the implementation of pilot projects serves the additional purpose of contributing to the
generation of new livelihoods, while the provision of adequate training programmes will ensure future
replicability of this experience in other areas
Improving the Protection and Stability of Coral Reefs and Associated
Communities
REQUESTING
REQUESTING NATIONAL/REGIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
COUNTRIES
Kenya: Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources and Kenya Wildlife
Mozambique, Seychelles, Mauritius: Ministry of Fisheries
South Africa, Tanzania
Mozambique: Ministry of Environmental Affairs
Seychelles: Ministry of Environment
South Africa: Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism (DEAT)
Tanzania: Ministry of Natural Resources and Tourism of Tanzania.
ENDORSEMENT:
Kenya
: Prof. Migot Adhola, Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Agriculture and
Rural Development
Mauritius: Minister of Fisheries,
Mozambique: Hon. John Kachamila, Minister of Environmental Affairs
Seychelles: Mr. Maurice Lousteau-Lalane, Principal Secretary, Ministry of
Environment
South Africa: Minister of Environment Affairs and Tourism (DEAT)
Tanzania: Minister of Natural Resources and Tourism
PROJECT LOCATION
EXECUTING AGENCY(IES)
Kenya: Mida-Watamu Creek in Malindi, Diani Reefs
Kenya: Kenya Wildlife Services (KWS), Kenya
Marine and Fisheries Research Institute. Seychelles:
Mozambique: Quirimbas Archipelago, Bazaruto Conservation Section, Ministry of Environment
Archipelago, Mozambique Island and surroundings, Mozambique: Ministry of Environmental Affairs,
Nacala Bay and Inhaca Island in Maputo Bay , Ponta GTA (Environment Working Group-Mozambique
do Ouro ,
Seychelles: Priority Sensitive Area of Mahe, Praslin,
Mauritius: Ministry of Fisheries and Ministry of
Mauritius – the whole coast of Mauritius and
South Africa: Department of Environmental Affairs
and Tourism (DEAT), KwaZulu-Natal Wildlife, South-Africa: Northern KwaZulu-Natal;
Tanzania: Dar-es-Salaam and Zanzibar.
Tanzania: Marine Parks and Reserves of Tanzania.
BACKGROUND AND OVERALL GOAL OR OBJECTIVE
This project intends to address the use patterns of coral reefs and related communities, by evaluating their
social, cultural and ecological values, facilitating the creation of alternative livelihoods and demonstrating a
series of conservation initiatives, such as buoy installations, to reduce pressure in certain hotspots. At the
same time, the project will revise, develop or support the necessary protective legislation, enhancing the
integration of coral reefs into the mainstream of decision making as part of an overall national integrated
coastal zone management plan. The project will support coral reef monitoring and research activities in order
to provide a sound platform of information and technical support for the relevant decision making bodies and
organizations, and it will help generate and increase awareness about the role of coral reefs and their
significance for the welfare of coastal communities and the national economy as a whole.
IMMEDIATE OBJECTIVES & EXPECTED RESULTS
Project objectives include (i) the creation of alternative livelihoods through key pilot projects, (ii) the
provision of a sound information and technical support platform for relevant stakeholders and decision-
makers, including an evaluation of associated social, cultural and ecological values, (iii) the mainstreaming of
coral reef management as part of national coastal zone management plans, with an emphasis on capacity
building for community management, (iv) the generation and enhancement of public awareness about the
pivotal role of coral reefs in relation to coastal communities and national economies.
MAIN COMPONENTS & ACTIVITIES
Component 1: Establishment of project management structures,
Component 2: Selection of the implementation sites,
Component 3: conduction of relevant studies and assessments,
Component 4: establishment of monitoring schemes,
Component 5: conduction of workshops and meetings,
Component 6: organisation of surveys and studies on coral reef status,
Component 7 : development and implementation of management strategies,
Component 8: preparation and implementation of an awareness campaign,
Component 9 : setting up of pilot projects,
Component 10: organisation of relevant seminars and meetings.
TIME FRAME:
COST & FINANCING
POTENTIAL INTERNATIONAL,
MULTILATERAL & BILATERAL
SOURCES
CO-FINANCING

LINKAGES TO RELEVANT ONGOING PROJECTS, PROGRAMMES & ACTIVITIES
This project may be linked to several ongoing programmes and proposals, among which the following are
salient: (i) the WWF-EAME Eastern African Marine Eco-regions programme (a strategy for implementing, n
partnership with countries, institutions, NGOs and other stakeholders, an action plan to reverse the
degradation of biodiversity in Eastern Africa), (ii) the CORDIO/GCRMN programme for the promotion of
sustainable use of coral reefs along the eastern Africa and Western Indian Ocean areas, (iii) the ICRI/ICRAN
initiatives to provide funding for coral reef monitoring, (iv) the WWF-Coral Reef Initiative, (v) numerous
GEF-supported projects, such as the UNDP-supported Mauritius Marine Protected Area, the Seychelles
Environment Programme, and the World Bank-supported Coastal and Marine Biodiversity Programme in
Mozambique, among others; and (vi) the WWF- supported programmes in Mozambique and Kenya for the
establishment of Marine Protected Areas, which include components on coral reefs, as happens in Mafia
Island, Quirimbas Archipelago and Bazaruto Archipelago.
SUSTAINABILITY FACTORS:
Coral reefs play vital roles both in terms of biodiversity and as the basis for national fishing and eco-tourism
industries. The implementation of the present project will not only attend the growing needs of these fragile
ecosystems within the context of IMCAM, but will also contribute to the amelioration of socio-economic
conditions in the participating countries by providing alternative livelihoods through the creation and
implementation of pilot projects, and by stimulating the growth of the tourism industry. In addition, it will
provide important capacity building, since it will provide a sound platform of technical support and training
for interested stakeholders, organisations and decision-making bodies, and it will contribute to the generation
of awareness among the population about the role of coral reefs for the welfare of coastal communities.
Development of Sound Land-use Practices and Reduction of Suspended
Solids in Estuaries and Lagoons in Sub-Saharan Africa
REQUESTING COUNTRIES
The Gambia, Ghana, Mozambique,
REQUESTING NATIONAL/REGIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
The Gambia: National Environment Agency
Ghana: Ministry of Environment and Sciences and Ministry of
Waters and Housing
Mozambique: Ministry of Coordination of Environmental Affairs
Nigeria: Federal Ministry of Environment
Senegal: Ministry of Youth, the Environment and Public Health
South Africa: Department of Environmental Affairs & Tourism,
University of Cape Town, CSIR
Tanzania: Ministry of Natural Resources and Tourism
ENDORSEMENT:
The Gambia:
Ghana:
Ministry of Environment and Sciences and Ministry of
Waters and Housing
Mozambique: Minister of Environment
Nigeria: Federal Ministry of Environment
Senegal: Director of the Environment and Classified
Establishments
South Africa: Minister Valli Moosa, Department of Environmental
Affairs& Tourism
Tanzania: Minister for Natural Resources and Tourism
PROJECT LOCATIONS
EXECUTING AGENCIES
The Gambia: Western Gambia
The Gambia: Department of Parks and Wildlife Management
Ghana: Water Resources Commission, Volta River Authority
Mozambique: UEM (Eduardo Mondlane University – UNESCO
Ghana: Korle Lagoon
Chair of Marine Sciences and Oceanography) Mozambique: Incomati, Zambezi
Nigeria: Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research
Nigeria: Niger Delta, Lagos, Elcet,
Senegal: Office of the National Parks of Senegal
South Africa: Department of Environmental Affairs & Tourism,
Senegal: Delta of the Senegal River
South Africa: Krynsa Estuary
Tanzania: Department of Forestry and Beekeeping
Tanzania: Rufiji River Basin
BACKGROUND AND OVERALL GOAL OR OBJECTIVE
Natural sedimentation and siltation inputs are key facdtors in the development and maintenance of coastal
habitats, including coastal wetlands, lagoons, estuaries and mangroves. Reduction in natural rates of
sedimentation can compromise the integrity of these habitats, as can excessive sediment loads, which may
bury benthic communities and threaten sensitive habitats such as coral reefs, mangroves, seagrass beds, and
rocky substrates. Contaminated sediments may also lead to pollution, through resuspension or improper
disposal. Anthropogenic modifications to sediment mobilization and sedimentation are caused by,
construction activities, forestry operations, agricultural practices, mining practices, hydrological
modifications, dredging activities, and coastal erosion. The present project proposal aims at promoting good
land use practices that would reduce erosion along the river valleys and therefore reduce suspended solids in
estuaries and lagoons.
IMMEDIATE OBJECTIVES & EXPECTED RESULTS
Immediate objectives include (i) to evaluate the ecological and socio-economic impacts of suspended solids in
estuaries and lagoons, (ii) to identify and promote good land use practices (agricultural and forestry) that may
reduce erosion in river valleys, and (iii) to promote awareness and environmental education.
Expected results include (a) a compilation of information on land used practices along river basins, (ii) an
evaluation of the ecological and socio-economic impacts of suspended solid inputs in estuaries and lagoons,
(iii) heightened public awareness, (iv) guidelines on good land use practices for reducing erosion in river
valleys, and (v) capacity-building among concerned communities.
MAIN COMPONENTS & ACTIVITIES
Component 1: Identification of current land use modalities in river valleys with serious siltation problems,
and awareness-raising on their impacts. This will include activities such an assessment of current sediment
loads in estuaries and lagoons, identification and analysis of relevant stakeholders and land-use survey.
Component 2: Identification and promotion of good land use practices for reduction of erosion, through
activities such as the implementation of a participatory process with local community support, the
development of studies for identifying beneficial land use practices, information dissemination, and capacity
building workshops and seminars.
TIME FRAME
COST & FINANCING
POTENTIAL INTERNATIONAL,
MULTILATERAL & BILATERAL
SOURCES
CO-FINANCING

LINKAGES TO RELEVANT ONGOING PROJECTS, PROGRAMMES & ACTIVITIES
The present proposal can be linked to the Nairobi and Abidjan Conventions, the Biodiversity convention,
UNCLOS, Agenda 21, and a number of initiatives such as the LOICZ programme, the GIWA project, the
GPA/LBA Integrated Coastal and River Basin Management Programme, and the Korle Lagoon Ecological
Restoration Project in Ghana.
SUSTAINABILITY FACTORS:
It is expected that the present proposal would result in an improvement of water quality in the estuaries,
lagoons and bays, in reduction of cost of dredging activities, which would in turn be reflected in an increase
in resource availability, biodiversity preservation and navigation and harbour services efficiency. The increase
in the availability of resources would contribute to the well being of the local communities and the
development of the coastal countries. Thus, this project contributes to the poverty alleviation and to the
promotion of sustainable development - the ultimate goal of the African Process and of NEPAD.
Development of Sustainable Coastal Tourism Policies & Strategies
REQUESTING
C

OUNTRIES
EQUESTING NATIONAL/REGIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
Côte d’Ivoire: Ministry of Tourism
Ghana: Ministry of Environment & Science / Ministry of Tourism
Kenya: Ministry of Tourism
Mauritius: Ministry of Environment,
Nigeria: Federal Ministry of Culture and Tourism
Senegal: Ministry of Environment Ghana: Environmental Protection Agency
Seychelles: Ministry of Tourism & Transport
South Africa: Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism (DEAT)
Tanzania: National Environment Management Council
ENDORSEMENT:
Côte d’Ivoire:
Ministry of Environment
Ghana: Ministry of Environment & Science, Ministry of Tourism
Kenya: The Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Tourism
Mauritius: Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Environment; Permanent Secretary,
Ministry of Tourism
Nigeria: Federal Ministry of Environment
Senegal: Ministry of Environment
Seychelles: Principal Secretary, Ministry of Tourism & Transport
South Africa: Minister of Environmental Affairs and Tourism (DEAT)
Tanzania: Division of Environment, Vice President’s Office
PROJECT LOCATION
EXECUTING AGENCIES
Côte d’Ivoire: Ministry of Tourism
Ghana: Ministry of Tourism
Kenya: Coastal Development Authority,
Mauritius: Ministry of Tourism
Nigeria: Federal Ministry of Culture and Tourism
Senegal: Ministry of Tourism
Seychelles: Ministry of Tourism & Transport
South Africa: Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism (DEAT) in
collaboration with other agencies
Tanzania: Board of Trustees of Marine Parks and Reserves
BACKGROUND AND OVERALL GOAL OR OBJECTIVE
The development of tourism in several sub-Saharan countries has taken place in an ad-hoc way, without proper
planning. The result has invariably been unequal –and in most cases noxious- pressure upon the natural
resources being exploited. Since sub-Saharan countries are increasingly turning to tourism as a solid
alternative for economic development, the natural resource base upon which income generation depends must
be preserved and used in a sustainable manner. Tourism can be a relatively clean industry, when compared to
other sectors such as the manufacturing industry; the aim of this project is, therefore, to develop an
appropriate policy, regulatory and strategy framework so as to develop a sustainable conventional coastal
tourism industry in the participating countries, placing strong emphasis on capacity-building.
IMMEDIATE OBJECTIVES & EXPECTED RESULTS
Immediate objectives include (i) the preparation of national policy documents to guide coastal tourism
development, (ii) the preparation of guidelines, planning procedures and controls to ensure compliance with
minimum infrastructure standards in the tourism industry, so as to ensure environmental sustainability, (iii)
the preparation of standards and guidelines for tourist facility site planning, (iv) the establishment of a sound
regulatory framework, including mandatory legal requirements for adequate sewage and solid waste facilities
in new tourism developments, and (v) capacity building, so as to strengthen national tourism administrations,
and promote the role of tourism enterprises in the sustainable development process. Expected results include a
strong policy and strategy national framework, a thorough assessment of present situation and analysis of
existing environmental impacts, mandatory guidelines for sustainable tourism development and enforceable
legislative and regulatory frameworks put in place, as well as a high level of sensitisation and awareness
among tour operators and national authorities.
MAIN COMPONENTS & ACTIVITIES
Component
1: Development of national policy and strategy framework for promoting environmental sustainability in the tourism industry in a wider context of coastal zone management. This will include thedevelopment of a thorough assessment of the present situation in regards to coastal tourism in participatingcountries, the organization of national consultations with stakeholders, and the elaboration of a policydocument.
Component 2: Development of Guidelines (including comprehensive planning procedures and controls) to ensure future development of tourism infrastructure meets set standards with the aim of minimisingenvironmental impacts and promoting sustainability. This component will include an assessment of theenvironmental impacts of existing infrastructure, and the preparation of model regional guidelines.
Component 3: Establishment of legal and regulatory framework governing tourism development in the coastal zones, and requiring all tourism projects to undergo an EIA and environmental authorization.
Component : Capacity building to strengthen the role of national tourism authorities and tourism enterprises in promoting sustainable coastal tourism development, inter alia through national and regional workshops
with tourism authorities and operators, and the production and dissemination of sensitisation materials for
visitors.
TIME FRAME
COST & FINANCING
POTENTIAL INTERNATIONAL,
MULTILATERAL & BILATERAL
SOURCES
CO-FINANCING

LINKAGES TO RELEVANT ONGOING PROJECTS, PROGRAMMES & ACTIVITIES
At the national level, the project has links with the national environment actions plans (NEAPs), or their
equivalent, of the respective participating countries. There are also important linkages with national “land use”
and “town and country” plans. At the regional level, the project links very closely with the objectives of the
Nairobi and Abidjan Conventions. The project has broad links with other ongoing international (and regional)
programmes to reduce impacts on the marine and coastal environment, such as the Global Programme of
Activities (GPA) to Protect the Marine Environment from Land-Based Activities, and in particular its project
on “Physical Alterations and Destruction of Habitats”, as well as the Convention on Biological Diversity
(CBD) programme to review guidelines on sustainable tourism, and the programme of the World Tourism
Organisation (WTO) Commission for Africa on Ecotourism & Protected Areas. The project is also related to
the “Tour Operators Initiative”, an initiative developed jointly by the World Tourism Organisation (WTO),
UNESCO and UNEP, in collaboration with a number of major tour operators.
SUSTAINABILITY FACTORS
Only consistent national guidelines and policies for the implementation of sustainable tourism practices can
fulfil the objective of promoting environmental conservation while providing sustainable livelihoods to local
communities and protecting their cultural heritage, especially in the present, when African countries are
accepting growing numbers of international visitors, with the consequent intensification of pressures upon
natural resources and host populations. When implemented, this project will strengthen national tourism
frameworks, provide a solid model for replication, and reinforce the existing linkages between interested
stakeholders, governmental agencies and the private sector.
Promoting Environmental Sustainability within the Tourism Industry
through Implementation of an Eco-certification and Labelling Pilot
Programme for Hotels

REQUESTING
C

OUNTRIES
EQUESTING NATIONAL/REGIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
The Gambia, Ghana, Kenya, The Gambia: National Environment Agency –NEA
Mauritius, Mozambique,
Ghana: Ministry of Environment & Science / Ministry of
Kenya: Ministry of Tourism
Mauritius: Ministry of Environment
Mozambique: Ministry for Coordination of Environmental Affairs
Nigeria: Federal Ministry of Culture and Tourism
Senegal: Ministry of Environment
Seychelles: Ministry of Tourism & Transport
ENDORSEMENT:
The Gambia
: National Environment Agency (NEA)
Ghana:Ministry of Environment & Science, Ministry of Tourism
Kenya: The Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Tourism
Mauritius: The Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Environment; Permanent
Secretary, Ministry of Tourism
Mozambique: Ministry for Coordination of Environmental Affairs
Nigeria: Federal Ministry of Environment
Senegal : Ministry of Environment
Seychelles: Principal Secretary, Ministry of Tourism & Transport
PROJECT LOCATIONS
EXECUTING AGENCIES
The Gambia: Gambia Tourism Agency-GTA / Department of State for
Ghana: Ministry of Tourism
Kenya: Coastal Development Authority
Mauritius: Ministry of Tourism
Mozambique: Ministry of Tourism / National Directorate of Environmental
Nigeria: Federal Ministry of Culture and Tourism
Senegal: Ministry of Tourism
Seychelles: Ministry of Tourism & Transport
BACKGROUND AND OVERALL GOAL OR OBJECTIVE
The economic potential of coastal tourism in participating countries has led to a growing development of the
industry, which is matched by unsustainable practices by most hotels, including lack of planning, poor
management practices, inadequate waste and water management schemes, excessive use of non-renewable
energy resources, etc., which bear serious impacts upon the health and well-being of marine and coastal
ecosystems. Since most African tourism is nature-based, these practices threaten in turn to degrade the
grounds of the industry itself: affected coastal zones will be less attractive as tourist destinations, resulting in
declining visitor arrivals and revenues. The main objective of the project is to undertake demonstration
activities towards the eventual establishment of national programmes of environmental certification (eco-
certification) and “eco-labelling” for hotels, with the aim of reducing and minimizing environmental impacts
of tourism development in coastal areas, and enhancing sustainable planning and managing of the sector.
IMMEDIATE OBJECTIVES & EXPECTED RESULTS
Specific objectives of this project include: (i) the introduction of long-term planning in hotel development and
management practices, within the framework of integrated coastal area management (ICAM), which will
produce as outputs a land-use development plan for the tourism industry, together with guidelines and criteria
for hotel infrastructure development, and an Environmental Management Plan to guide national hotel
management practices; (ii) improvements to waste-water management by hotels, so as to produce measurable
indicators for discharged water, appropriate solutions and capacity for waste water management, as well as
solid waste capabilities; (iii) ensuring long-term quality of bathing water and beaches, which will produce a
set of measurable water quality indicators and a publication on environmental performances; (iv) the
introduction of water conservation measures, performing a water consumption audit in order to devise the
most effective interventions; (v) reducing the consumption of energy from sources such as electricity, gas and
fuel, (vi) introducing renewable sources of energy, (vii) introducing good environmental site management
practices through the rehabilitation of habitats and species, appropriate soft landscaping measures and adequate
protection of beaches and sand dunes from erosion and degradation; (viii) capacity-building and staff training
for environmental management, (ix) promotion of changes in purchasing practices, and (x) sensitisation of
visitors to environmental and cultural heritage issues.
MAIN COMPONENTS & ACTIVITIES
Component 1: Sensitization among hotels on environmental management systems, including the conduction
of an economic valuation study, so as to obtain full voluntary commitment to the proposed eco-certification
and eco-labelling schemes.
Component 2: Environmental performance audit of participating hotels, together with an “Introductory
Training Course” on the steps required for certification and the technical, economical and social results and
advantages of sustainable management practices.
Component 3. Design and development of an Environmental Management System (EMS) based on
international standards to be undertaken by hotels under the guidance and supervision of an independent third
party.
Component 4: Implementation of the agreed EMS by each participating hotel within a given timetable, with
external technical and governmental assistance.
Component 5: Assessment and monitoring to determine the achievement of recommended actions and steps.
Component 6: Continuation of the process to continuously upgrade environmental standards.
TIME FRAME
COST & FINANCING
POTENTIAL INTERNATIONAL,
MULTILATERAL & BILATERAL
SOURCES
CO-FINANCING

LINKAGES TO RELEVANT ONGOING PROJECTS, PROGRAMMES & ACTIVITIES
The project has broad links to international and regional programmes to reduce impacts of tourism on the
marine and coastal environment, such as the Global Programme of Action (GPA) to Protect the Marine
environment from Land-Based Activities, the Framework Convention on Climate change (FCCC) and the
“Tour Operators Initiative”. Wherever possible, the project will create linkages with initiatives being
undertaken by regional and international hotel chains, and to the ongoing WTO study on the effectiveness of
voluntary initiatives such as certification and eco-certification schemes.
SUSTAINABILITY FACTORS
As a result of project implementation, hotels will be encouraged and supported in their efforts to introduce
improved environmental management practices. In addition to positive environmental gains, hotel
establishments will benefit economically and technically from improved management, in the form of energy
savings and more effective use of equipment. There will also be local benefits in terms of increasing purchase
of local products, which will in turn promote economic linkages with local communities.
Preparation of National Ecotourism Policies & Strategies and Identification
of Pilot Projects for Implementation
REQUESTING COUNTRIES
The Gambia, Ghana, Kenya,
REQUESTING NATIONAL/REGIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
Mauritius, Mozambique, Senegal, The Gambia: National Environment Agency –NEA, Gambia Tourism
Seychelles, South Africa
Authority –GTA.
Ghana: Ministry of Environment & Science, Ministry of Tourism
Kenya: Ministry of Tourism
Mauritius: Ministry of Environment
Mozambique: Ministry of Tourism
Senegal: Ministry of Environment
Seychelles: Ministry of Tourism & Transport
South Africa: Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism
(DEAT)
ENDORSEMENT:
The Gambia:
National Environment Agency – NEA, Gambia Tourism
Authority -GTA
Ghana:Ministry of Environment & Science, Ministry of Tourism
Kenya: The Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Tourism
Mauritius: The Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Environment;
Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Tourism
Mozambique: National Director of Tourism
Senegal: Director of Environment & Classified Establishments, Ministry
of Environment
Seychelles: Director of Tourism Development, Ministry of Tourism &
Transport
South Africa: Minister of Environmental Affairs and Tourism (DEAT)
PROJECT LOCATION
EXECUTING AGENCIES
The first component of the project The Gambia: Gambia Tourism Authority - GTA
will be implemented during the Ghana: Ministry of Environment & Science, Ministry of Tourism
first 18-24 months and will focus Kenya: Coastal Development Authority
on the development of a national Mauritius: Ministry of Tourism
policy / strategy to promote Mozambique: Ministry of Tourism
ecotourism and will not be site Senegal: Ministry of Tourism
specific.
the Seychelles: Ministry of Tourism & Transport
first South Africa: Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism
component, pilot projects will be (DEAT)
identified for implementation from
year three of project.
BACKGROUND AND OVERALL GOAL OR OBJECTIVE
As an important and growing sector in sub-Saharan Africa, well-planned and managed ecotourism can play a
key role in the process of sustainable development, given its potential to contribute to poverty alleviation by
providing alternative, environmentally-friendly livelihoods for rural communities, and the revenues that it can
generate, which may be used for environmental conservation through devices such as park entry/user fees,
landing fees, taxes on hunting and fishing, etc. None of the participating countries has developed a specific
policy of framework for ecotourism development; therefore, the overall objective of this project is to develop a
comprehensive and proactive national ecotourism policy and strategy framework, including a planning
process, impact assessment and management, and identification and implementation of pilot projects, in such
a manner as to maximize the involvement of local communities and the preservation of threatened ecosystems.
IMMEDIATE OBJECTIVES & EXPECTED RESULTS
Specific objectives of the project include: (i) preparation of a policy-strategy framework for ecotourism
development (Planning Process), in order to produce a general policy on the sector, a database of existing
ecotourism activities and lessons learned, a map of sensitive and protected areas, and an assessment of
resource use and legislation gaps; (ii) establishment of a Multi-Stakeholder Management System to promote
ecotourism (Management Process), which will produce inter alia, working National Ecotourism Committees,
a set of guidelines for the management process, standardized formats and procedures for cultural and
environmental impact assessment, a set of indicators for measuring acceptable change, monitoring structures
and mechanisms, and public awareness and capacity-building programmes; and (iii) identification and
implementation of pilot ecotourism projects, which shall be implemented with Governmental support on a
community basis, so as to promote sustainable, alternative livelihoods among concerned groups.
MAIN COMPONENTS & ACTIVITIES
Component 1: Planning and Management process.
Sub-component 1.1
.: Planning process, with the aim of ensuring that the future development of ecotourism is sustainable. This will include activities such as the identification of stakeholders and appointment of NationalEcotourism Committees, the preparation and publication of general policy/vision statements for ecotourismdevelopment, the compilation and review of baseline information and the assessment of the legislative andregulatory framework.
Sub-component 1.2 .: Management process, including activities such as the preparation of procedures for the study of project proposals, the preparation of formats and steps for impact assessment, the development of
impact management guidelines, the establishment of a notification process for project approval, the
implementation of a monitoring structure and certification scheme, the organization of a national awareness
and training programme.
Component 2: Identification and implementation of pilot projects, with continuous monitoring of project
results in accordance with the developed guidelines.
TIME FRAME
COST & FINANCING
TOTAL COST: US$4.4 million
POTENTIAL INTERNATIONAL,
US$3.3 million
MULTILATERAL & BILATERAL
SOURCES
CO-FINANCING

US$ 1.1 million
LINKAGES TO RELEVANT ONGOING PROJECTS, PROGRAMMES & ACTIVITIES
The project is related to the ongoing programme of the World Tourism Organisation Commission for Africa
on Ecotourism and Protected Areas, aimed at the effective implementation of policies and strategies for
sustainable tourism development, and also with the activities developed in most of the participating countries
in connection with the International Year of Ecotourism (IYE), which included the establishment of
“ecotourism committees”. Efforts will be made during project development to identify relevant best practices,
with the assistance of agencies such as WTO, WWF and IUCN.
SUSTAINABILITY FACTORS:
The project will provide the grounds for harmonizing African nations’ growing interest in the promotion of
the tourism sector with the need to protect fragile ecosystems, as well as with the needs of impoverished local
communities. Through the implementation of the participatory scheme devised in this project for the
formulation of national ecotourism strategies, a high degree of national ownership will be guaranteed for
future interventions, while ensuring that national strategies respond to the true requirements of concerned
communities and threatened habitats. In addition, sustainable financing mechanisms for environmental
conservation will be generated, and pilot projects will contribute to future replicability elsewhere.
Pilot Measures to Demonstrate Best Practices in Mitigating Environmental Impacts of Tourism: Reef Recreation Management REQUESTING COUNTRIES
Kenya, Mauritius, Mozambique and
REQUESTING NATIONAL/REGIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
Kenya: Director of Tourism
Mauritius: Ministry of Environment
Mozambique: Ministry of Tourism
Seychelles: Ministry of Environment and Transport
ENDORSEMENT:
Kenya:
[ongoing consultations]
Mauritius: [ongoing consultations]
Mozambique: [ongoing consultations]
Seychelles: Minister of Environment and Transport
PROJECT LOCATIONS
EXECUTING AGENCIES
Kenya: Mida –Watamu Creek in
Kenya: Coast Development Authority, Kenya Wildlife Service and the
Mauritius: Ministry of Environment
Mauritius: 15 important popular
Mozambique: Ministry of Coordination of Environmental Affairs
Seychelles: Marine Conservation Society of Seychelles (MCSS
–NGO), Island Conservation Society of Seychelles (NGO), Seychelles Flac, Le Morne and Pointe d’ Esny.
Center for Marine Research and Technology, Seychelles Island Mozambique: Quirimbas
Foundation, Tour Companies and Yatch Companies e.g. Sunsail and Bazaruto.
Seychelles: Cosmoledo, Aldabra,
Mahe, Praslin, La Digue and other
inner Islands.
BACKGROUND AND OVERALL GOAL OR OBJECTIVE
The development of coastal tourism, albeit beneficial for the economies of participating countries, can bring
with it a number of resource use conflicts and environmental degradation problems. Coral reefs are among the
most vulnerable and affected ecosystems, as highlighted in the national reports, especially those of the Indian
Ocean. Coral reef degradation results in decreased visitor arrivals, and therefore in less tourism earnings and
increased poverty of coastal communities. One of the ways to mitigate and prevent damage to these key
ecosystems is through the implementation of reef recreation management; the objective of this project is,
therefore, to develop management strategies for sustainable reef recreation, focusing on the relationship
between recreation development in sensitive or affected coral areas and environmental issues. The main
tourism activity that will be addressed in this project is the diving industry.
IMMEDIATE OBJECTIVES & EXPECTED RESULTS
The specific objective of this project is the installation of mooring buoys in pilot project sites, to protect coral
reefs against anchor damage from diving activities. Building on the opportunity of a regional dimension for
this project, activities will demonstrate and share best practices in mitigation measures to protect endangered
species. Expected outputs include the strengthening of local capacity to enable expansion of the intervention
after the expiry of this project phase, the minimization of coral damage, institutional arrangements to promote
sustainability of the project, and strengthening of the reef recreation framework.
MAIN COMPONENTS & ACTIVITIES
Component 1: Survey of sensitive areas and damaged sites to establish management procedures, including (i)
the enforcement of legislation that will demand capacity estimations for specific sites and consequent
restrictions of the leisure activities, and (ii) control procedures for enforcement.
Component 2: Procurement, installation and maintenance of equipment. Buoy equipment shall be identified,
purchased and installed; a maintenance programme will be developed, and a sequential build-up to the
required level of protection shall be offered through activities such as the documentation of use patterns and
associated damage to justify mooring buoy installation, the development of a zoning plan, the rotation of
available mooring buoys, and the installation of marker buoys around reefs to warn boaters of the navigation
hazards.
Component 3: Capacity building, education and awareness; this component will pursue the implementation of
education and communications strategies for the general public on basic marine ecology, as well as mooring
buoy systems use, through local community education programmes and developed communication
techniques.
Component 4: Regulation and enforcement, with a focus on securing adequate funding for boat patrols,
issuing clear and consistent regulations, and implementing a strong education programme to aid enforcement
by encouraging proper use of mooring buoys and compliance with protective legislation.
TIME FRAME
COST & FINANCING
POTENTIAL INTERNATIONAL,
MULTILATERAL & BILATERAL
SOURCES
CO-FINANCING

LINKAGES TO RELEVANT ONGOING PROJECTS, PROGRAMMES & ACTIVITIES
This proposal is linked to other national and regional activities that seek to understand and protect coral reefs
in other ways, including (i) the IUCN-supported project on coral reefs in Kenya, (ii) CORDIO, (iii)
Conservation International’s agenda to improve the stability and protection of coral reefs in Eastern and
Southern Africa, (iv) the International Coral Reef Initiative (ICRI) of IUCN, and (v) the Global Coral Reef
Management Network (GCRMN) and the International Coral Reef Action network (ICRAN).
SUSTAINABILITY FACTORS
The project will provide pilot demonstrations of diving destination management. Sustainable reef recreation
activities may stimulate economic growth, promote environmental education and public awareness while
preserving the integrity of crucial marine environments. The project will provide management tools and
background knowledge in the application of intervention measures to counter the negative impacts of tourism,
while providing a model for replication in other countries. Once implemented, the management of the
mooring buoy system can be transferred to community-based organisations so as to promote alternative
livelihood options.
Assessment and Mitigation of the Ecological and Socio-economic Impacts of
Destructive Fishing Practices in sub-Saharan Africa
REQUESTING COUNTRIES
Ghana, Kenya, Mozambique,
REQUESTING NATIONAL/REGIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
Ghana: Ministry of Food and Agriculture
Kenya: Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute
Mozambique: Ministry of Fisheries
Nigeria: Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research
South Africa: Department of Environmental Affairs & Tourism (DEAT)
ENDORSEMENT:
Ghana:
Ministry of Environment and Science, Ministry of Food and
Agriculture
Kenya: Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development
Mozambique: Ministry of Coordination of Environmental Affairs
Nigeria: Ministry of the Environment
PROJECT LOCATIONS
EXECUTING AGENCIES
Ghana: Keta Lagoon complex
Ghana: Department of Fisheries
Kenya: Malindi Bay, Ungwana
Kenya: Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute, Fisheries
Mozambique: Ministry of Fisheries - Institute for Development of
Mozambique: Coastal
Nigeria: Federal Department of Fisheries, Nigerian Institute for
Oceanography and Marine Research, Nigerian Navy Nigeria: Niger Delta - Lagos
South Africa: Department of Environmental Affairs & Tourism (DEAT)
[SOUTH AFRICA?]
BACKGROUND AND OVERALL GOAL OR OBJECTIVE
The high rates of population growth in Africa pose serious pressure upon coastal and marine environments in
terms of food and livelihoods, in particular upon fisheries, which are the object of increasingly destructive
harvesting practices as fishermen strive to augment their catch, regardless of fish stock sustainability.
Mosquito Nets, beach seining, use of poison and dynamite, artisanal speargun fishing and other types of
noxious fishing techniques were among the destructive practices identified in Phase I of the African Process;
their mitigation was placed by participating countries as a priority issue, given their impact upon fish stocks
and their contribution to the loss or modification of habitats and ecosystems, especially coral reefs, mangrove
forests and seagrass beds. The overall objective of this project is to enhance the sustainable use of marine
fisheries and marine and coastal ecosystems through the control of destructive fishing practices, and to
facilitate the development of a participatory fisheries management regime, as a basis for improved
management of transboundary and high value stocks in sub-Saharan Africa.
IMMEDIATE OBJECTIVES & EXPECTED RESULTS
The specific objectives of this project are: (i) to maximize the benefits derived by local communities from
fisheries in terms of food, income and employment; (ii) to control and/or eliminate destructive fishing
practices in the participating countries; (iii) to promote fisheries management with community and
government involvement; (iv) to preserve threatened biodiversity; (v) to harmonize national management
programmes so as to reverse the damage caused by destructive fishing practices; and (vi) to implement pilot
projects in order to improve the productivity of artisanal fisheries. Expected outputs include the production of
the necessary information to improve the management of threatened fisheries, the design of strategies and
mechanisms for co-operative fisheries management, the identification and demonstration of mitigation
measures, the strengthening of local capacity for effective fisheries management, the development of policies
with greater community participation and the ensuring of long-term fish availability for local communities,
which will result in better health, employment and living standards.
MAIN COMPONENTS & ACTIVITIES
Component 1: Improvement of fisheries research and information base. Activities will be oriented towards
project development, further definition of the nature and extent of the problem, and formulation of plans to
address it; they will include the gathering of relevant information and data on destructive fishing practices, the
implementation of field studies on such practices’ ecological, social and economic impacts, the development
of a database and GIS for use in decision making, the identification of priority areas for intervention and the
development of a plan of action for subsequent component activities.
Component
2: Community participation in fisheries management in the framework of co-management, as an essential step towards the elimination of destructive fishing gears. Appropriate incentives must be granted,such as community-based micro-enterprise programmes and micro-credit schemes to facilitate alternativelivelihoods. Local CBOs and NGOs will be trained in fisheries management. Community-Based FisheriesManagement Committees shall be encouraged and formed where they do not exist. Education and awareness-raising programmes shall be carried out at different levels.
Component 3: Strategic management of fisheries. Activities will include the review and evaluation of fisheries management practices in participating countries, review and harmonisation of national laws and regulations on
the fishing industry, and implementation of pilot projects.
TIME FRAME
COST & FINANCING
POTENTIAL INTERNATIONAL,
MULTILATERAL & BILATERAL
SOURCES
CO-FINANCING

LINKAGES TO RELEVANT ONGOING PROJECTS, PROGRAMMES & ACTIVITIES
This project can be linked to a number of donor-funded development initiatives undertaken in participating
countries, such as the Tanga Coastal Zone Conservation and Development Program in Tanzania, which is
funded by the Irish Aid, with technical support from the World Conservation Union (IUCN), the African
Development Bank project for the Nampula Province fisheries in Mozambique, the GEF/World Bank projects
in in Cabo Delgado and Nampula in Mozambique, the work of WWF in Kenya in support of the Chale
Marine Reserve and in Tanzania’s Mafia Island marine park. In South Africa, WWF is also investigating the
distribution and ecology of linefish, helping establish coastal and marine conservation areas, and studying the
fish resources of St Lucia Bay and Tsitsikamma Reef, as well as undertaking a number of projects on marine
mammals, turtles, and shellfish.
SUSTAINABILITY FACTORS:
The main objectives of this project –to ensure a more sustainable harvesting of important resources, on which
not just the livelihoods and food security of coastal popoulations depend, but which also impact the fishing
industry- is a decisive factor in effectively addressing concrete issures related to the alleviation of pervasive
poverty and to the modification of environmental degradation and resource over-exploitation patterns. As a
combination of research, capacity-building, support to fisheries management authorities, co-management and
elimination of destructive fishing practices, this project will enhance sustainable use of fisheries resources in
the long-term.
Mariculture Development in sub-Saharan Africa
REQUESTING COUNTRIES
Côte d’Ivoire, The Gambia, REQUESTING NATIONAL/REGIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
Ghana,
Mauritius, Côte d’Ivoire: Ministry of Agriculture and Natural Resources
Nigeria, The Gambia: National Environment Agency -NEA, Organisation pour la
Seychelles, South Africa and Mise en Valeur de la Fleuve de la Gambie (OMVG)Tanzania Ghana: Ministry of Environment & Science, Ministry of Food and
Agriculture
Kenya: Fisheries Department
Mauritius:
Mozambique: Ministry of Fisheries
Nigeria: Nigerian Institute of Oceanography and Marine Research
Seychelles: Seychelles Fishing Authority (Ministry of Agriculture and
South Africa: Department of Environmental Affairs & Tourism
Tanzania: Ministry of Natural Resources and Tourism
ENDORSEMENT:
Côte d’Ivoire:
Minister of Agriculture and Natural Resources The Gambia:
Ghana:
Minister of Environment & Science
Kenya: The Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Environment and Natural
Resources
Mauritius:
Mozambique:

Ministry for Coordination of Environmental Affairs Nigeria: Minister of Environment
Seychelles: Principal Secretary, Ministry of Agriculture and Marine
Resources
South Africa:
Minister of Environmental Affairs & Tourism Tanzania: Minister for Natural Resources and Tourism
PROJECT LOCATIONS
EXECUTING AGENCIES
Côte d’Ivoire: Le Grand-Lahou, Côte d’Ivoire: Direction of Fisheries and Aquaculture
Vridi and Assinie inlets
The Gambia: National Environment Agency -NEA, Organisation pour la
The Gambia:
Mise en Valeur de la Fleuve de la Gambie (OMVG), Department of Water Ghana: Ada-Anyanui Mangrove Resources
Complex, Volta Estuary, River
Ghana: Ministry of Food and Agriculture, Directorate of Fisheries
Kenya: Fisheries Department
Kenya: Mida Creek, Kipini,
Mauritius
Mozambique: National Directorate of Fisheries Administration, Institute
Mauritius:
for the Development of Small Scale Fisheries (IDPPE) Mozambique: Zambezi Delta,
Nigeria: Nigerian Institute of Oceanography and Marine Research (NIOMR)
Seychelles: Seychelles Fishing Authority
Nigeria: Lagos, Eket,
South Africa: Department of Environmental Affairs & Tourism (DEAT),
Seychelles: Mahe, Praslin
Tanzania: Department of Fisheries
South Africa: All coastal
provinces (Northern Cape,
Western Cape, Eastern Cape,
KwaZulu-Natal)
Tanzania
BACKGROUND AND OVERALL GOAL OR OBJECTIVE
Coastal communities in sub-Saharan Africa are critically affected by declining availability of fish, due to
overharvesting and other causes. However, anthropogenic pressure upon fish stocks is increasing as coastal
populations expand, since few if any alternative sources of livelihood have been devised to deal with basic
human needs. Mariculture, as an important alternative to natural resource harvesting, contributes to the
reduction of pressure upon wild fish stocks, the provision of employment and of cheap protein to coastal
populations in need. Existing constraints to its development in sub-Saharan Africa include insufficient
availability of investment capital, lack of suitable markets, lack of infrastructure and expertise, political
instability, inappropriate policies and lack of research. The overall goal of this project is to promote
mariculture operations in participating countries, thus creating sustainable livelihood alternatives for coastal
populations and reducing pressure upon threatened marine resources.
IMMEDIATE OBJECTIVES & EXPECTED RESULTS
The immediate objectives of the project are: (i) to address major constraints to mariculture development in the
region, (ii) to promote the mainstreaming of mariculture-related policies and legislation, (iii) to build capacity
for undertaking mariculture projects within relevant government departments, research organizations, NGOs,
CBOs and other stakeholders, and (iv) to promote, initiate and monitor pilot projects in the participating
countries.
Expected outputs include a thorough assessment of the major constraints to the development of a mariculture
industry in sub-Saharan Africa, and of its environmental impacts; the production of guidelines,
recommendations and the design of mitigation measures to ensure minimal negative environmental impacts
and sustainable development of the mariculture industry; enhanced policy and legislation frameworks for the
promotion of the industry within the region; increased capacity for mariculture project management within
relevant stakeholders; and a limited number of pilot projects in key coastal areas, involving local communities
and industry partners.
MAIN COMPONENTS & ACTIVITIES
Component

Source: http://www.environnement.gouv.sn/IMG/pdf/2-summaries-projects.pdf

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